Debbie Mandel’s
Turn On Your Inner Light
Weekly Wellness Newsletter
February 20, 2005
www.TurnOnYourInnerLight.com


Affirmation of the Week
To be wronged is nothing
unless
you continue to remember it

Introducing CD
Meditations to Turn On Your Inner Light
Meditation CD Image
"At the request of my readers I have created a CD, Meditations To Turn On Your Inner Light, to facilitate relaxation and good energy. Set to music the meditations are an excellent complement to my book and will help you to manage your stress, your anger and your fear to finally let go of what is weighing you down"
More details

Weekly Wellness Radio Show

The Turn On your Inner Light Radio Show airs Tuesday evenings 7:00 to 7:30pm, on WGBB 1240AM in Long Island. Listeners outside the Long Island area can listen to the show live by going to WGBB Live. The shows are archived for your listening pleasure.

Guest of the Week - Nadine Taylor

On February 22, 2005 - Nadine Taylor, R.D., co-author of Runaway Eating. Older women are dying to be thin as they wrestle with self image. We will learn about the hidden triggers.


Health Tips of the Week

  • Donít give up your cup of coffee, yet! Coffee has been found to help prevent diabetes and Parkinsonís and now you can add liver cancer to the list.
  • Elderly patients cared for by a spouse are at a higher risk of abuse like: name calling, threatening abandonment, withholding food or rough physical handling. It is important to help alleviate the pressure of being a caregiver. Studies show that adult children do not do enough to help out their elderly parents and at the same time their parents do not wish to ask them for help because they perceive it as a burden.
  • Sudden emotional shocks like grief and loss have the power to kill you. Doctors call this the broken heart syndrome. The good news is that the condition is reversible, assuming that you get medical intervention in time.
  • Another study proclaims that eating fish and walnuts can lift your spirits. It is worthy to note that fish-eating cultures have lower rates of depression.
  • Over-praised kids, are poorly equipped to cope with criticism and problems at school and work. Even self-esteem can be over-rated. Work on a healthy balance.
  • Blocking the effects of estrogen may offer a new way to stop lung cancer growth and reduce deaths from the disease. The results of a new study show that estrogen may trigger growth in lung cancer cells similar to the way that estrogen causes breast cancer cells to grow and spread. There is an interesting link here.
  • Toxics spewed from tailpipes and factory smokestacks can damage the genes of unborn babies raising a child's risk of getting cancer later in life. This latest study addresses pollution in urban areas, particularly in low income neighborhoods which have an unfair share of polluters like power plants and bus depots. Childhood asthma is already on the rise in urban areas. This is the first study to look at chromosomal damage in the womb.


Article of the Week -
How to Have a Constructive Conflict

Many of us bolt out the door as soon as we sniff the onset of a conflict. We like to accommodate and please, rather than express our true opinions. Conflict shakes up our sense of balance and sense of belonging. After all, we are looking for smiles and applause, not criticism and confrontation. However, conflict can be stimulating and educational. It helps us to transform and grow. By generating energy conflict encourages us to leave a complacent world and continue to improve.

Words can be either musical instruments or the weapons of conflict. The right word will clear up misunderstandings while the wrong word will alienate. When we communicate, we need to be aware of what we are saying both rationally and emotionally, what tone of voice and body language we are using and how what we are saying will be received. We have to evaluate the listener. While many of us have been trained to say what we think, we often need a reminder to think before we speak. Emily Dickinson said, ďA word said, is never dead.Ē

When engaged in a conflict, instead of trying to prove the other person wrong and ourselves right, we can try to be open to learning the other personís perspective. When we hear the other side, we enlarge our own perspective to see that perhaps the other viewpoint has some merit. Also, we can understand how to strengthen our position and express it, so that the other person can absorb it.

We can attack a person and force him to defend himself against us, like a cornered animal. Or we can hide our true feelings and reactions to the other party and withhold our opinions, causing us to feel depressed with the nagging thought, ďI should have said...Ē However, if we objectively and calmly express our feelings, reality as we see it, then the other party will hear us and not feel upset or act defensively. More


Frank Mikulka's Fitness Tip Of The Week
Iíve heard many different directions for doing a proper crunch and I am getting confused. Also, I donít know if Iím getting the most out of the ones Iím doing now? (Sarah, Levittown) Answer

Send your fitness question to: fitness@turnonyourinnerlight.com

Debbie Mandel, MA is the author of Turn On Your Inner Light: Fitness for Body, Mind and Soul, a stress-reduction specialist, motivational speaker, a personal trainer and mind/body lecturer. She is the host of the weekly Turn On Your Inner Light Show on WGBB 1240 AM in Long Island and has been featured on radio/ TV and print media.

To learn more: www.turnonyourinnerlight.com